Generated by
JDiff

javax.naming.spi Documentation Differences

This file contains all the changes in documentation in the package javax.naming.spi as colored differences. Deletions are shown like this, and additions are shown like this.
If no deletions or additions are shown in an entry, the HTML tags will be what has changed. The new HTML tags are shown in the differences. If no documentation existed, and then some was added in a later version, this change is noted in the appropriate class pages of differences, but the change is not shown on this page. Only changes in existing text are shown here. Similarly, documentation which was inherited from another class or interface is not shown here.
Note that an HTML error in the new documentation may cause the display of other documentation changes to be presented incorrectly. For instance, failure to close a <code> tag will cause all subsequent paragraphs to be displayed differently.

Class DirObjectFactory

This interface represents a factory for creating an object given an object and attributes about the object.

The JNDI framework allows for object implementations to be loaded in dynamically via object factories. See ObjectFactory for details.

A DirObjectFactory extends ObjectFactory by allowing an Attributes instance to be supplied to the getObjectInstance() method. DirObjectFactory implementations are intended to be used by DirContext service providers. The service provider in addition reading an object from the directory might already have attributes that are useful for the object factory to check to see whether the factory is supposed to process the object. For instance an LDAP-style service provider might have read the "objectclass" of the object. A CORBA object factory might be interested only in LDAP entries with "objectclass=corbaObject". By using the attributes supplied by the LDAP service provider the CORBA object factory can quickly eliminate objects that it need not worry about and non-CORBA object factories can quickly eliminate CORBA-related LDAP entries. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.7 01/0212/0903 @see NamingManager#getObjectInstance @see DirectoryManager#getObjectInstance @see ObjectFactory @since 1.3


Class DirStateFactory

This interface represents a factory for obtaining the state of an object and corresponding attributes for binding.

The JNDI framework allows for object implementations to be loaded in dynamically via object factories.

A DirStateFactory extends StateFactory by allowing an Attributes instance to be supplied to and be returned by the getStateToBind() method. DirStateFactory implementations are intended to be used by DirContext service providers. When a caller binds an object using DirContext.bind() he might also specify a set of attributes to be bound with the object. The object and attributes to be bound are passed to the getStateToBind() method of a factory. If the factory processes the object and attributes it returns a corresponding pair of object and attributes to be bound. If the factory does not process the object it must return null.

For example a caller might bind a printer object with some printer-related attributes.

 ctx.rebind("inky" printer printerAttrs); 
An LDAP service provider for ctx uses a DirStateFactory (indirectly via DirectoryManager.getStateToBind()) and gives it printer and printerAttrs. A factory for an LDAP directory might turn printer into a set of attributes and merge that with printerAttrs. The service provider then uses the resulting attributes to create an LDAP entry and updates the directory.

Since DirStateFactory extends StateFactory it has two getStateToBind() methods where one differs from the other by the attributes argument. DirectoryManager.getStateToBind() will only use the form that accepts the attributes argument while NamingManager.getStateToBind() will only use the form that does not accept the attributes argument.

Either form of the getStateToBind() method of a DirStateFactory may be invoked multiple times possibly using different parameters. The implementation is thread-safe. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.6 007 01/0212/0203 @see DirectoryManager#getStateToBind @see DirObjectFactory @since 1.3


Class DirectoryManager

This class contains methods for supporting DirContext implementations.

This class is an extension of NamingManager. It contains methods for use by service providers for accessing object factories and state factories and for getting continuation contexts for supporting federation.

DirectoryManager is safe for concurrent access by multiple threads.

Except as otherwise noted a Name Attributes or environment parameter passed to any method is owned by the caller. The implementation will not modify the object or keep a reference to it although it may keep a reference to a clone or copy. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.8 01/0212/0903 @see DirObjectFactory @see DirStateFactory @since 1.3


Class InitialContextFactory

This interface represents a factory that creates an initial context.

The JNDI framework allows for different initial context implementations to be specified at runtime. The initial context is created using an initial context factory. An initial context factory must implement the InitialContextFactory interface which provides a method for creating instances of initial context that implement the Context interface. In addition the factory class must be public and must have a public constructor that accepts no arguments. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.5 006 01/0212/0203 @see InitialContextFactoryBuilder @see NamingManager#getInitialContext @see javax.naming.InitialContext @see javax.naming.directory.InitialDirContext @since 1.3


Class InitialContextFactoryBuilder

This interface represents a builder that creates initial context factories.

The JNDI framework allows for different initial context implementations to be specified at runtime. An initial context is created using an initial context factory. A program can install its own builder that creates initial context factories thereby overriding the default policies used by the framework by calling NamingManager.setInitialContextFactoryBuilder(). The InitialContextFactoryBuilder interface must be implemented by such a builder. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.5 007 01/0212/0203 @see InitialContextFactory @see NamingManager#getInitialContext @see NamingManager#setInitialContextFactoryBuilder @see NamingManager#hasInitialContextFactoryBuilder @see javax.naming.InitialContext @see javax.naming.directory.InitialDirContext @since 1.3

Class InitialContextFactoryBuilder, InitialContextFactory createInitialContextFactory(Hashtable)

Creates an initial context factory using the specified environment.

The environment parameter is owned by the caller. The implementation will not modify the object or keep a reference to it although it may keep a reference to a clone or copy. @param environment Environment used in creating an intialinitial context implementation. Can be null. @return A non-null initial context factory. @exception NamingException If an initial context factory could not be created.


Class NamingManager

This class contains methods for creating context objects and objects referred to by location information in the naming or directory service.

This class cannot be instantiated. It has only static methods.

The mention of URL in the documentation for this class refers to a URL string as defined by RFC 1738 and its related RFCs. It is any string that conforms to the syntax described therein and may not always have corresponding support in the java.net.URL class or Web browsers.

NamingManager is safe for concurrent access by multiple threads.

Except as otherwise noted a Name or environment parameter passed to any method is owned by the caller. The implementation will not modify the object or keep a reference to it although it may keep a reference to a clone or copy. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.1516 01/0212/0903 @since 1.3


Class ObjectFactory

This interface represents a factory for creating an object.

The JNDI framework allows for object implementations to be loaded in dynamically via object factories. For example when looking up a printer bound in the name space if the print service binds printer names to References the printer Reference could be used to create a printer object so that the caller of lookup can directly operate on the printer object after the lookup.

An ObjectFactory is responsible for creating objects of a specific type. In the above example you may have a PrinterObjectFactory for creating Printer objects.

An object factory must implement the ObjectFactory interface. In addition the factory class must be public and must have a public constructor that accepts no parameters.

The getObjectInstance() method of an object factory may be invoked multiple times possibly using different parameters. The implementation is thread-safe.

The mention of URL in the documentation for this class refers to a URL string as defined by RFC 1738 and its related RFCs. It is any string that conforms to the syntax described therein and may not always have corresponding support in the java.net.URL class or Web browsers. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.5 006 01/0212/0203 @see NamingManager#getObjectInstance @see NamingManager#getURLContext @see ObjectFactoryBuilder @see StateFactory @since 1.3


Class ObjectFactoryBuilder

This interface represents a builder that creates object factories.

The JNDI framework allows for object implementations to be loaded in dynamically via object factories. For example when looking up a printer bound in the name space if the print service binds printer names to References the printer Reference could be used to create a printer object so that the caller of lookup can directly operate on the printer object after the lookup. An ObjectFactory is responsible for creating objects of a specific type. JNDI uses a default policy for using and loading object factories. You can override this default policy by calling NamingManager.setObjectFactoryBuilder() with an ObjectFactoryBuilder which contains the program-defined way of creating/loading object factories. Any ObjectFactoryBuilder implementation must implement this interface that for creating object factories. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.5 006 01/0212/0203 @see ObjectFactory @see NamingManager#getObjectInstance @see NamingManager#setObjectFactoryBuilder @since 1.3


Class ResolveResult

This class represents the result of resolution of a name. It contains the object to which name was resolved and the portion of the name that has not been resolved.

A ResolveResult instance is not synchronized against concurrent multithreaded access. Multiple threads trying to access and modify a single ResolveResult instance should lock the object. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.7 01/0212/0903 @since 1.3


Class Resolver

This interface represents an "intermediate context" for name resolution.

The Resolver interface contains methods that are implemented by contexts that do not support subtypes of Context but which can act as intermediate contexts for resolution purposes.

A Name parameter passed to any method is owned by the caller. The service provider will not modify the object or keep a reference to it. A ResolveResult object returned by any method is owned by the caller. The caller may subsequently modify it; the service provider may not. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.5 006 01/0212/0203 @since 1.3


Class StateFactory

This interface represents a factory for obtaining the state of an object for binding.

The JNDI framework allows for object implementations to be loaded in dynamically via object factories. For example when looking up a printer bound in the name space if the print service binds printer names to References the printer Reference could be used to create a printer object so that the caller of lookup can directly operate on the printer object after the lookup.

An ObjectFactory is responsible for creating objects of a specific type. In the above example you may have a PrinterObjectFactory for creating Printer objects.

For the reverse process when an object is bound into the namespace JNDI provides state factories. Continuing with the printer example suppose the printer object is updated and rebound:

 ctx.rebind("inky" printer); 
The service provider for ctx uses a state factory to obtain the state of printer for binding into its namespace. A state factory for the Printer type object might return a more compact object for storage in the naming system.

A state factory must implement the StateFactory interface. In addition the factory class must be public and must have a public constructor that accepts no parameters.

The getStateToBind() method of a state factory may be invoked multiple times possibly using different parameters. The implementation is thread-safe.

StateFactory is intended for use with service providers that implement only the Context interface. DirStateFactory is intended for use with service providers that implement the DirContext interface. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.5 006 01/0212/0203 @see NamingManager#getStateToBind @see DirectoryManager#getStateToBind @see ObjectFactory @see DirStateFactory @since 1.3