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javax.naming Documentation Differences

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Class CompositeName

This class represents a composite name -- a sequence of component names spanning multiple namespaces. Each component is a string name from the namespace of a naming system. If the component comes from a hierarchical namespace that component can be further parsed into its atomic parts by using the CompoundName class.

The components of a composite name are numbered. The indexes of a composite name with N components range from 0 up to but not including N. This range may be written as [0 N). The most significant component is at index 0. An empty composite name has no components.

JNDI Composite Name Syntax

JNDI defines a standard string representation for composite names. This representation is the concatenation of the components of a composite name from left to right using the component separator (a forward slash character (/)) to separate each component. The JNDI syntax defines the following meta characters: Any occurrence of a leading quote an escape preceding any meta character an escape at the end of a component or a component separator character in an unquoted component must be preceded by an escape character when that component is being composed into a composite name string. Alternatively to avoid adding escape characters as described the entire component can be quoted using matching single quotes or matching double quotes. A single quote occurring within a double-quoted component is not considered a meta character (and need not be escaped) and vice versa.

When two composite names are compared the case of the characters is significant.

A leading component separator (the composite name string begins with a separator) denotes a leading empty component (a component consisting of an empty string). A trailing component separator (the composite name string ends with a separator) denotes a trailing empty component. Adjacent component separators denote an empty component.

Composite Name Examples

This table shows examples of some composite names. Each row shows the string form of a composite name and its corresponding structural form (CompositeName).

String Name CompositeName
"" {} (the empty name == new CompositeName("") == new CompositeName())
"x" {"x"}
"x/y" {"x" "y"}
"x/" {"x" ""}
"/x" {"" "x"}
"/" {""}
"//" {"" ""}
"/x/" {"" "x" ""}
"x//y" {"x" "" "y"}

Composition Examples

Here are some composition examples. The right column shows composing string composite names while the left column shows composing the corresponding CompositeNames. Notice that composing the string forms of two composite names simply involves concatenating their string forms together.

String Names CompositeNames
"x/y" + "/" = x/y/ {"x" "y"} + {""} = {"x" "y" ""}
"" + "x" = "x" {} + {"x"} = {"x"}
"/" + "x" = "/x" {""} + {"x"} = {"" "x"}
"x" + "" + "" = "x" {"x"} + {} + {} = {"x"}

Multithreaded Access

A CompositeName instance is not synchronized against concurrent multithreaded access. Multiple threads trying to access and modify a CompositeName should lock the object. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.9 0110 02/1204/0302 @since 1.3

Class CompoundName

This class represents a compound name -- a name from a hierarchical name space. Each component in a compound name is an atomic name.

The components of a compound name are numbered. The indexes of a compound name with N components range from 0 up to but not including N. This range may be written as [0 N). The most significant component is at index 0. An empty compound name has no components.

Compound Name Syntax

The syntax of a compound name is specified using a set of properties:
jndi.syntax.direction
Direction for parsing ("right_to_left" "left_to_right" "flat"). If unspecified defaults to "flat" which means the namespace is flat with no hierarchical structure.
jndi.syntax.separator
Separator between atomic name components. Required unless direction is "flat".
jndi.syntax.ignorecase
If present "true" means ignore the case when comparing name components. If its value is not "true" or if the property is not present case is considered when comparing name components.
jndi.syntax.escape
If present specifies the escape string for overriding separator escapes and quotes.
jndi.syntax.beginquote
If present specifies the string delimiting start of a quoted string.
jndi.syntax.endquote
String delimiting end of quoted string. If present specifies the string delimiting the end of a quoted string. If not present use syntax.beginquote as end quote.
jndi.syntax.beginquote2
Alternative set of begin/end quotes.
jndi.syntax.endquote2
Alternative set of begin/end quotes.
jndi.syntax.trimblanks
If present "true" means trim any leading and trailing whitespaces in a name component for comparison purposes. If its value is not "true" or if the property is not present blanks are significant.
jndi.syntax.separator.ava
If present specifies the string that separates attribute-value-assertions when specifying multiple attribute/value pairs. (e.g. " " in age=65 gender=male).
jndi.syntax.separator.typeval
If present specifies the string that separators attribute from value (e.g. "=" in "age=65")
These properties are interpreted according to the following rules:
  1. In a string without quotes or escapes any instance of the separator delimits two atomic names. Each atomic name is referred to as a component.
  2. A separator quote or escape is escaped if preceded immediately (on the left) by the escape.
  3. If there are two sets of quotes a specific begin-quote must be matched by its corresponding end-quote.
  4. A non-escaped begin-quote which precedes a component must be matched by a non-escaped end-quote at the end of the component. A component thus quoted is referred to as a quoted component. It is parsed by removing the being- and end- quotes and by treating the intervening characters as ordinary characters unless one of the rules involving quoted components listed below applies.
  5. Quotes embedded in non-quoted components are treated as ordinary strings and need not be matched.
  6. A separator that is escaped or appears between non-escaped quotes is treated as an ordinary string and not a separator.
  7. An escape string within a quoted component acts as an escape only when followed by the corresponding end-quote string. This can be used to embed an escaped quote within a quoted component.
  8. An escaped escape string is not treated as an escape string.
  9. An escape string that does not precede a meta string (quotes or separator) and is not at the end of a component is treated as an ordinary string.
  10. A leading separator (the compound name string begins with a separator) denotes a leading empty atomic component (consisting of an empty string). A trailing separator (the compound name string ends with a separator) denotes a trailing empty atomic component. Adjacent separators denote an empty atomic component.

The string form of the compound name follows the syntax described above. When the components of the compound name are turned into their string representation the reserved syntax rules described above are applied (e.g. embedded separators are escaped or quoted) so that when the same string is parsed it will yield the same components of the original compound name.

Multithreaded Access

A CompoundName instance is not synchronized against concurrent multithreaded access. Multiple threads trying to access and modify a CompoundName should lock the object. @author Rosanna Lee @author Scott Seligman @version 1.7 018 02/1204/0318 @since 1.3